royal-british-legion

2020 Royal British Legion Poppy Appeal

Yet one more thing affected by the outbreak of Coronavirus is this year's Royal British Legion Poppy Appeal. Normally, at this time of year, we would be welcoming you into our branches to collect poppies and to make a donation in memory of members of the armed forces who have made such sacrifices and given such diligent service. Sadly, because of the constraints of social distancing, we are not able to handle money, collecting boxes or poppies this year.

However, we are still determined to honour those who have served us so well, so we have set up a special page for remembrance for this year's appeal. You can make a donation online and leave a message to remember a loved one if you follow the link here.

Melanie Hunnaball, Director of the Hunnaball Family Funeral Group, spoke about our disappointment that the British Legion Poppy Appeal has been so badly hit by the advent of the Coronavirus crisis. She said, “The British Legion does so much invaluable work with veterans and their families, and a huge number of our past and present clients have great emotional attachment to this cause. They are very keen to collect their poppy from us every year. However, due to social distancing measures, this year it simply isn’t possible.

“We ourselves will still be remembering all those who suffered and gave their lives to keep us safe. This will be reflected in the displays in our branch windows, and our people will be laying wreaths at local war memorials as a sign of our remembrance. We certainly will not forget, and will be encouraging others to mark the occasion and make a donation, albeit a little differently this year.”

The Hunnaball Family Funeral Group feels a deep affinity with the armed forces, having been present in the garrison town of Colchester for nearly three decades, employing a number of ex-service personnel, and having conducted many military funerals.

“At the going down of the sun and in the morning we will remember them...”

from ‘For the Fallen’, by Laurence Binyon